The best and original 24/7, online, Smooth Jazz Internet Radio station : Largest Global contemporary jazz community, jazz charts, jazz festivals and jazz recording artists Launch Radio Station

Listen to SmoothLounge.com Global Radio

SmoothJazz.com JazzBlast - email signup

Submitting Your Music for Airplay Consideration

Listen to SmoothJazz.com Internet Radio
FREE RADIO APP

LIKE us on FaceBook

Follow Us on Twitter

SmoothLounge.com Radio - For the Chill of It

SmoothTravelTV YouTube Channel

SmoothIndieStar.com - Top 50 Indie Chart

SmoothTravel Features

Wine & Jazz Club

Start Shopping at Amazon.com

Start Shopping at CD Baby

Start Shopping at Amazon.com

SmoothJazz.com SoundCloud - Hear Artist Promo, Interviews and more

Smooth Jazz & Wine Club
LISTEN AND EARN POINTS

SmoothJazz Global Blog

Navbar More Artist Interviews Artist Website Buy Album Download Music FaceBook YouTube

Garry Goin

Garry Goin

Garry Goin

How did this new album and overall concept for it come about, and what are your ultimate goals with it?

Road trip was conceived during a discussion with my management on what it’s like to be on the road. We use to call it “one tank trips”. Like most musicians, I love being in front of my fans, no matter where they are in the world. I recall someone telling me once “What You Are is Where You Were When”, which to me was the essence of this project, a reflection of the places I have been and people I have met. I wanted to do a project like this for years, with a lot of encouragement from my fans, friends, and family, I paused to put my experiences to music.
Road trip starts on the East Coast and makes its way through the country, down the back roads, over the twisted highways, through the airports, and over the oceans. It takes you from the big cities, to South America, Japan, South Africa, and ends on the beaches of California, it stops at each place I performed and embraces each fan and tells them thank you. The trip ends with a song entitled “Ocean Breeze”, there you find yourself sitting on the beach, relaxing after a long trip, listening to the ocean, the waves hitting the shore, and the seagulls flapping in the wind to a beautiful melody.
My ultimate goal for this project is to thank the fans and let them know that they are all reflected and represented in this project. My hope is that they will sit back, close their eyes and relive to the wonderful times we spent together.

What elements do you look for in a song that makes it especially satisfying for you to perform?

roove, Melody, and Personality.
It always starts with a groove, something you can feel, it makes you tap your feet, hum the hook and it touched your soul. Following that, I look at the melody, it like the icing on the cake, it makes everything sweet and appealing. Additionally, each song breathes a life of its own; it connects with you and provides that feeling of familiarity, it’s like connecting with an old friend. Now take a song like "Are We There Yet” which was co-written by Songwriters Hall of Famer, David Porter. David’s rich songwriting history brought that Soulsville feel. The icing on the cake was the addition of featured sax man Kirk Whalum. Kirk put a kick in the groove and excitement in the melody, this song was fun to play. The groove is the chef's entrée, the melody is dessert, and the personality is the satisfying feeling you get when you take it all in.

Of your touring and gigs so far in your career, do any stand out as being particularly memorable or defining moments:

There're a few that really stands out. Cape Town South Africa would be at the top of the list. I was fortunate enough to share the stage with some of the best artisit out there, Oleta Adams, Jonathan Butler, and my favorite saxophonist Kirk Whalum. Cape Town South Africa was a life changing experience. From the time my feet touched the ground, I felt a sense of belonging, the heritage is rich and the people are incredible. When we hit the stage, I felt a warm embrace from the people, the whole tour made me feel like I could give more of myself. Another tour that stands out was the Cotton Club in Tokyo, Japan. The emotional connection I felt with the fans proved to me that math and music is a universal language. As a songwriter and producer, you are always concerned that what you created won’t connect to the audience; it’s like a reality check. When you have an engaged audience, like those at the Cotton Club, it lets you know you’re on the right track. There are so many places and people I’ve encountered and who gave me great memories, so I had to tell it in a song called "My Story"

How would you finish this sentence?

I don't like to go a day without letting the people I love know it. I believe my music is another avenue to communicate that. That might be the reason I enjoy the creative process so much, it gives me a far reaching voice to communicate my feelings.

What would be the most important piece of advice you'd impart to a young musician just starting out in the jazz/smooth Jazz arena?

Creating rituals are essential to a healthy learning environment. I would tell them to start their journey by researching the history of jazz. The foundation and technical complexity of jazz goes much deeper than some of the more popular/programmed styles of music. I would also encourage them to listen to all forms of music. The lesson will be to find your own voice. When I was starting out, I wanted to be a top 40 style musician, I recall my father saying, if you can play jazz, you will be able to play any form of music. He also expressed to me the importance of learning to read and write music, that advice has served me well. When you combine your natural talents with your formal learning, you will find your niche. I would also address the importance of practicing your craft. If you are serious about being a good musician, or singer for that fact, you have to put in the time. Being a great musician shouldn’t feel like work, if you are doing something you love, it should be easy to dedicate the needed time to be proficient at your craft.
The biggest piece of advice I would give is, Have Fun!

What are some of the most important goals you have for yourself in the next 5 to 10 years?

In the next 5 to 10 years, I would like to have established my record label (GrapevineSquare), production company, and performing arts school. I hope to have toured the country with great musicians, playing great songs, hopefully those I have had a hand in the creative process. And most importantly, I would like to have established a mentoring program to give back to the aspiring young talent we have. I believe being in a position to give back to our community would be a significant accomplishment.

You Support SmoothJazz.com when you start your shopping here Start your shopping at Amazon.com Start Your Shopping at CD Baby Making Contact Start your shopping at iTunes Music Store Start your shopping in the SmoothJazz.com Listening Loft Store

SmoothJazz.com Top 10 Vid Bar
SmoothJazz.com Top 50 Industry Chart SmoothJazz.com Indie Chart SmoothJazz.com Radar Chart SmoothJazz.com Top 50 Album Chart
Chart Album Image
PETER WHITE
Smile
HEADS UP/CMG
CD Cover
JAREZ
On Top Of The World
Jazz, Hip-Hop and R&B!
More
Maggie Herron Live
Maggie Herron at Lewers Lounge
Wed-Sat Nights
Halekulani Hotel, Honolulu
More>>
Start Your Shopping Here Shop for new music at CDBaby.com Shop for new music at iTunes Music Store Shop Amazon.com Top Selling Jazz Albums Shop in the SmoothJazz.com Listening Loft Store
Like Us on FaceBook Re-Tweet Us on Twitter Subscribe to our SmoothTravel Jazz TV Channel
National Association of Digital Broadcasters - SmoothJazz.com registered as KJAZ-DB